Dave Scott – 6x Ironman Winner Q&A | Wiggle

Dave Scott – 6x Ironman Winner Q&A | Wiggle


I was swimming in Kailua Bay that’s where
the Ironman race is. I was off-shore probably a kilometre or more and all of a sudden this
pig came swimming across the bay. I’m not kidding – it was a real pig! There’s wild pigs that root up in the
coffee orchards. This one happened to come down and take
a swim during Ironman week so that was quite unusual! I just went on my way and the pig did as well… This is a massive, massive question – I don’t know
who sent this in but this is like a long college course. Let me give you a couple of quick pointers. First off, don’t change your diet during the
last week in preparation for your race. Maintain doing the same thing. Number two, make sure that you finish dinner
at least by six o’clock (18.00) two days before the race. The reason is, you’ll be getting up really
early in the morning to have that morning breakfast, probably at 4am. So, 6pm, you’re finishing your breakfast,
So say it’s a Saturday race, Thursday, Friday – you’re done with it. Number three, don’t eat in transition one. People get out of the swim and think “oh
boy, I got to gobble down this whole buffet table”. That’s total nonsense – you’re going to get
sick. you can get away with it on the bike but you
don’t want this big bowl of food in your stomach. And number four, right after T1, wait 15
or 20 minutes, when you’re on the bikes or your sweat rate, heart rate, or breathing
rate can come up and levels off… then you can introduce your nutrition. I didn’t tell you what to eat because that’s
in a long dissertation later. I think first off you have to look at your
running style. And running style is also indicative of your
background, so a lot of people that are merging into the sport have a tendency to stick longer
when they land, so their foot lands on the ground and it doesn’t pop off right away. If you’re a heavier runner that’s a different
type of shoe as well. People have a tendency to gravitate to the
lightest shoe – but that’s a mistake. I’m not a minimalist fan where the drop from
the heel to the forefoot is zero millimetres. I think a lot of people have a huge stretch
in their Achilles so hide from those shoes. Pick one that fits your body contours and
your running style. I think, even going all the way back, I was
always kind of an athlete in my youth and all the way up through high school and college
and I was always compelled just to see how far I could push myself and I didn’t have
all the metrics that are used nowadays – power meters and the watches – and so intuitively
I trained hard. I always wanted to push the parameters of
what my mental aptitude was. And I think a lot of people de-condition themselves
and I think a lot of athletes turn off that mental switch and they don’t really challenge
themselves. I get another response, “I just want to have
a fun race…”. You know what’s fun? It’s fun to go hard. So tell your mind, “don’t fear success”. Push that button that allows you to programme
yourself to tolerate the highest level of discomfort. You can do it. One of the questions I’m always asked, “Gee
David, you won the Ironman six times, you got second
three times. You really had perfect races.”. I never had a perfect race. There were moments where I had a lot of self-doubt
and I was on kind of an emotional roller coaster. And I’ll just reflect on one race. Last Ironman race that I did – no one talks
about it. I was fifth place. It was 1996 and I always think that that was
my best race ever. And the reason is, is that I kinda gave up
– I kinda feared failure on the swim and the bike. Dreadful day on both of those and I said I
have an opportunity on the run. And so, all of a sudden, I turned that fear
of failure to ‘how can I be successful in this race?’. And so when I put on my running shoes with
26.2 miles to go I said, “This is it.” “Now I do have this golden opportunity to run
fast.” So, I think when we kind of set the parameters
of fear of success and fear of failure it’s a real fine pinnacle and there’s lots of different
levels of successes, so revel in those little successes as you’re training. And in the race always look at the good elements
while you’re racing and when you finish it, go back and say, “what did I do well?”. You did something well. I have an almanac on this. I have three thousand of these tips, but I’ll
tell you the first one and it happens to be apropos with this pond in the background. It’s that a lot of athletes kind of negate
the ability to work on their swim bio-mechanics; their swim technique. It looks fluid, it looks effortless, but it’s
not. What you have to master is good technique
and the medium of water is a real puzzle for a lot of people. You have to have good breathing, good rhythm. Your legs have gotta be doing something, your
core has to be strong, what are my arms doing? So, in working on the swim that is really
paramount to being a good triathlete. Number two is something that we always neglect
– do mobility stretching and strength training year-round. Triathletes are inherently really bad in their
shoulders, their rotator cuff, the middle of their back – the thoracic spine – and their
hips. Those are the big three. Work on those, and even if you can garner
a centimetre here or there it will really help offset some of the niggling injuries. Number three, is something I’ve alluded to
many, many times, it’s that everyone has potential and I think a lot of times we put a cap on
our potential. The sport of triathlon has so many different
avenues to improve and I think once we get to a certain point or a certain age, are there
are other areas you can work on to improve and heighten your performance? Always.

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